Nederlands Exposition in Auschwitz Going into hiding

Help to people in hiding

Personal story: Slomp en Kuipers-Rietberg

Landelijke Organisatie voor Hulp aan Onderduikers


Organisations for helping people in hiding
Personal story: Süskind en Cohen
Afbeelding 4 Afbeelding 3Afbeelding 2Afbeelding 1
  1. Frits Slomp (1898-1978)
    Frits Slomp was a Dutch Reformed minister. Under the pseudonyms Frits de Zwerver and Van Zanten he began to look for hiding addresses for Germans who refused to do military service in the Wehrmacht. During a church service in Zwolle on 12 July 1942 Slomp told his church members to sabotage the work of the Forced Labour. He was promptly threatened with arrest. He was warned on time and went into hiding. At the end of November 1942, he met Helena Kuipers-Rietberg. She and her husband helped people in hiding and upon her urgent request Slomp began to set up a national network: Landelijke Organisatie voor Hulp aan Onderduikers (The National Organisation for Helping People in Hiding). Slomp, 'Fritz'Frits de Zwerver', travelled throughout the Netherlands and held unannounced sermons under his pseudonym. Eventually he was caught, but his comrades managed to free him from jail. After that the minister went into hiding again.
    Unknown photographer, NIOD Collection, Amsterdam
  2. Helena Kuipers-Rietberg (‘tante Riek’) (1893-1944)
    Helena Rietberg was raised in Winterswijk in a middle class family that belonged to the Dutch Reformed church. She was an active member of social and religious organisations. Kuipers-Rietberg was a deeply devout woman. Even before the war she felt that National Socialism conflicted with her Christian values. After the German invasion, she and her husband Piet supported the resistance, and eventually her entire family became involved. Kuipers-Rietberg devoted lots of time and energy to find hiding places for Jews. Together with Minister Slomp, she founded the Landelijke Organisatie voor Hulp aan Onderduikers. On 18 August 1944, Kuipers-Rietberg and her husband were arrested. Via the Vught concentration camp Kuipers-Rietberg was transported to Ravensbrück. At the end of October 1944 she became sick and died.
    Unknown photographer, NIOD Collection, Amsterdam
  3. Documents related to the betrayal of Jews in hiding by members of the Kolonne Henneicke.
    In March 1943, the authorities paid 7.50 Dutch guilders for bringing in a Jew who was found hiding. The Kolonne Henneicke became notorious as a group of fanatic Jew hunters under leadership of Wim Henneicke, that worked for the Hausraterfassung, an organisation that was among other things responsible for clearing the homes of deported Jews. Henneicke organised a team of more than 50 people, which brought in more than 8,000 Jews in less than one year.
    NIOD Collection, Amsterdam
  4. Documents related to the betrayal of Jews in hiding by members of the Kolonne Henneicke.
    In March 1943, the authorities paid 7.50 Dutch guilders for bringing in a Jew who was found hiding. The Kolonne Henneicke became notorious as a group of fanatic Jew hunters under leadership of Wim Henneicke, that worked for the Hausraterfassung, an organisation that was among other things responsible for clearing the homes of deported Jews. Henneicke organised a team of more than 50 people, which brought in more than 8,000 Jews in less than one year.
    NIOD Collection, Amsterdam
Glossary
floorplan
introduction
jew in the netherlands
refugees
german invasion
persecution
resistance
going into hiding
sinti and roma
deportation
dutch people in auschwitz
guest book
people in hiding
help to people in hiding